Catalonia’s election – and ours in May – could begin a new conversation. For decades, Western states have suffered from democratic malaise (Britain is merely an extreme case). . Challenges for popular control of state power thus assume critical importance.

Source Direct: Catalonia Dreaming


The investigation into the Scottish Government’s handling of the Salmond affair has consumed column inches and online discussions. But that’s all happening in bubbles of political trainspotters. What about public sentiment? Does anyone care?

Source Direct: A House Divided



You can’t really argue with twenty polls in a row for independence. And those same polls show the SNP sweeping May’s planned elections. Yet dig deeper and the Scottish independence movement is filled with dread and acrimony.

Source Direct: Scotland – Now?


“It takes more than a headline to change a country. The policies must match up too. And this is where the government all too easily slips back into old language, old rhetoric and old ideas of the old ‘normal’ of the pre-pandemic world.”

Analysis: Scottish Budget 2021-22


The prospect of state collapse, whether orderly or disorderly, remains very real. That said, theoretical possibilities are one thing. Making it happen is quite another. States of Britain’s standing don’t just topple of their own accord. Any breakup of a venerable old imperial power requires concerted political agency – a plan, in short.

Source Direct: Roadmap to Nowhere?


It’s tempting to ignore the Scottish Labour leadership election. Here will be two career politicians with milquetoast opinions fighting for the soul of a party that long ceased to matter in Scotland’s real power stakes.

Source Direct: On the Slab


Theoretically, there should be an element of shock in Richard Leonard’s resignation as Scottish Labour leader, so close to a Holyrood election. But nobody seems even remotely surprised.

Source Direct: Slabbed Through the Heart