“Independence supporters face the prospect of explaining and reaffirming the expanded mandate for they have won. Many will not look forward to beating their head against this particular brick wall once again, as the unionist counter-argument will only become more shrill, obstinate and unconcerned with democracy the more they are put on the defensive.”

Sean Bell: After the election, what comes next?


I am not of the view that independence is economically impossible. But I’m also not a denier of facts. The deficit, Brexit and the pandemic are facts. And Sturgeon’s existing economic prospectus poses huge logistical problems.

Source Direct: The Economics of Feasible Independence


The prospect of state collapse, whether orderly or disorderly, remains very real. That said, theoretical possibilities are one thing. Making it happen is quite another. States of Britain’s standing don’t just topple of their own accord. Any breakup of a venerable old imperial power requires concerted political agency – a plan, in short.

Source Direct: Roadmap to Nowhere?




“Much as I love the independence movement, more far-fetched schemes hatched on social media but with no chance of implementation may make you feel better, but will be as pointless over the five years to come as they were in the five that we just lived through.”

Robin McAlpine: Unite? Behind what exactly?


“From the virus itself, to the economic fallout, party infighting and the national question in Scotland, the party will struggle mightily to present a unified and popular alternative. What prospects are there for Starmerism in the 2020s?”

The mounting problems facing Starmer’s new Labour era